Fred Leland

Police Ethos:The Warrior and Guardian Mindset Are They Not One In the Same?

Over the last several years there has been much discussion in policing on the terms warrior and guardian or I should say, warrior verses guardian. The political climate and or political correctness from both inside and outside policing has clouded and created much uncertainty, that puts both police and those they serve in danger. For generations, police have trained, fought crime and violence and died because of what some men did contrary to our way of life. The American way of life.

Developing Police Sergeants: Getting the Outcomes and Measures of Effectiveness Right

I spent the last week facilitating The Sergeants Leadership Class for the Massachusetts Police Training Committee (MPTC). The class is a five day class full of officers who vary in years of experience on the job but are new to the leadership position of sergeant. The course is packed full of theory, leadership styles such as theory X &Y, McGregor’s Transformational leadership, etc. We cover personalities and Myers Briggs is taken by the new sergeants who get a chance to discuss and reflect upon who they and their fellow students are.

Col John Boyd's Patterns of Conflict Expanded to Policing Part 2: Don't Just Be a Reactor..Be a Shaper Too!

In Part 2 of this video series Boyd continues with his idea, what he calls a "New Conception" of fast transients O-O-D-A Loops that lead to outmaneuvering an adversary. The idea of fast transients suggests that, in order to win, we should operate at a faster tempo or rhythm than our adversaries—or, better yet, get inside adversary’s observation-orientation-decision-action time cycle or loop.

Smart Tactics Takes Thinking Police Leaders...Leading Thinking Cops

Chet Richards as another timely piece up on his Slightly East of New blog. The title of the piece is Smart Tactics in which he discusses how the United States Marine Corps took 15 years to evolve from attrition warfare and centralized control methods to maneuver warfare and decentralized control (Mission Command).

Wrestling With Delayed and Immediate Entry, Solo and Team Tactics...Are We Really Expecting All to Go as Rehersed?

I was out in the western part of Massachusetts teaching an in-service training class to a group of about 50 police officers. These cops are from small towns and often work their towns alone. No back-up immediately available! A conversation during class took place that sparked some debate on immediate versus delayed, solo versus team entry tactics and which is the best practice for dealing with ongoing threats such as, an active shooter, terrorist attack, or ambushes. Is immediate entry and a solo response always the way to go, or do 2, 3 and 4-man techniques still apply?

Professional Reading and Development: It Doesn’t Give All the Answers, But It Lights What Is Often a Uncertain Path Ahead

"Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth." ~Marcus Aurelius

What Are The Force Multipliers That Allow Police Organizations to Operate at Rapid OODA Loop Tempos?

When teaching, writing about and discussing adaptive leadership, the critical questions that often ariseare, what type of organization operates at rapid OODA Loop tempos and how do we implement it? How are we suppose to size up situations, focus our efforts, so they are safe and effective with mission type orders and mutual trust? How do we develop an organizational climate for operational success?

Why Frontline Employees Should Make All Decisions:Lessons Police Can Learn From The Corporate Rebels

On Chet Richards recommendation I surfed over to the Corporate Rebels site and found this great piece, "Why Frontline Employees Should Make All Decisions" To those of you, who know me and, frequent my blog will understand why this article was particularly appealing to me and, why it should be of interest to policing is also, glaringly clear.

In this post the Corporate Rebels discus the status quo of command-and-control:

What was Boyd Thinking and...What Can Policing Learn From It?

I just had to share this piece and great illustration on John Boyd's work from Chet Richards's site Slightly East of New. All too often in policing we play follow the follower when it comes to new ideas, strategy and tactics.

Proper Mindset, Situational Awareness, Skill Proficiency and Physical Fitness: Force Multipliers of Great Value to Police

In the introduction to their book Law Enforcement Close Quarter Battle: Urban Tactics For Individuals, Teams and Tactical Units, Special Tactics, defines The Four Pillars of Survival as proper mindset, situational awareness, skill proficiency and physical fitness. They go on to say, these pillars form the basis for mission success and improve split second decision-making in direct combat situations.

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