Fred Leland

An Officer’s Principal Weapon is His Mind: Professional Development In Policing

Professional police development is designed to develop creative, thinking officers, who will eventually become leaders, leading thinking officers. My definition of a professional police development is not solely about formal education although this is part of it. My definition is focused more on professional development and job focused training. Professional police education is also very much about the autodidacts those self learners who strive to reach high levels of professionalism on their own.

The Art of Police Training is the Ability to Move Officers Through the Fog and Complexity of Human Interaction

The purpose of all police training is to develop officers that can solve societies complex problems. The fundamental objectives of policing (also referred to as the mission of the police or the core functions of policing) are the ultimate purposes for which police agencies have been created. Herman Goldstein was one of a number of scholars who recognized and articulated the breadth and complexity of the police mission.

Teaching Officers How to Think verses Telling Them What To Think

Educating future leaders and officers in “how to think” (cognitive skills) takes longer and is intellectually far more expensive than industrially based task training, while task training requires resources like weapons, ranges, equipment, and special facilities that require training be done at established locations, requiring centralization. The good news is that recent studies by Dr. Bjork (UCLA) have discovered that theories about learning have been wrong.

Thinking Leaders, Leading Thinking People is the Adaptive Leaders Focus

I am often asked the question: what is adaptive leadership? My response is if you want your organization (police department), community and society to thrive in the rapidly changing world, adaptive leadership is for you.

Vehicle Stops Strategies and Tactics: Being Safe and Effective Is About Options, Not Best Practices

“Direct experience is inherently too limited to form an adequate foundation either for theory or for application.  At the best it produces an atmosphere that is of value in drying and hardening of thought. The greater value of indirect experience lies in its greater variety and extent. History is universal experience, the experience not of another, but of many others under manifold conditions.” ~B. H. Liddell Hart

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