Crises Preparedness

Second Episode in This Podcast Series with Complete Emergency Managment: Leadership in Public Safety

In the first episode with Complete EM George and I discussed Active Shooters and After Action Reviews. In this second of two episodes Leadership in Public Safety George Whitney and I talk about the differences between management and leadership; mistakes and gross negligence; success and failure during response.

Podcast: I sit down with George Whitney of Complete EM and discuss: Active Shooters and After Actions

George Whitney of Complete EM each week speaks with people making a difference in emergency management. They talk about what works, what doesn't, how to work efficiently, and how to get it done with maximum effect. In this podcast ACTIVE SHOOTERS AND AFTER ACTIONS I speak with George about police response to active shooter incidents.

Podcast on The Command Culture Necessary to Reshape the Golden Hour of Crisis

Sand Table

George Whitney each week speaks with people making a difference in emergency management. They talk about what works, what doesn’t, how to work efficiently and how to get it done with maximum effect.

Crisis Meta-Leadership Lessons From the Boston Marathon Bombings Response: The Ingenuity of Swarm Intelligence

“Never tell your people how to do things. Tell them what to do, and they will surprise you with their ingenuity.” ~ General George Patton

Incident Strategy and Tactics: The Baby Diaper Analogy

Is it more important to be a kick-ass gunfighter? ...or to have the wisdom and understanding on how to stay out of a gunfight in the first place? And on which of these things should police instructors being focusing their efforts? This debate isn't limited to only the use of police deadly force; it's one that permeates law enforcement education and training as a whole.

Adaptability is Key in Handling Crisis Situations…Be In Command and Out Of Control

“…the first thing I told our staff is that we would be in command and out of control,” Van Riper says echoing the words of management guru Kevin Kelly. “By that, I mean that the overall guidance and the intent were provided by me and the senior leadership, but the forces in the field wouldn’t depend on intricate orders coming from the top. They were to use their own initiative and be innovative as they went forward….” Paul Van Riper, US Marine commander.

Incident Command: the team cohesion aspect of the SitRep

Over the past few weeks, I have been re-engineering Police Incident Command according to The Illinois Model law enforcement operations system (LEOpSys). Most of the ideas aren't earth-shattering, but they suggest some small adjustments to the nationally-mandated program. The first several posts lay some foundation into our vision of what IC should be.

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