Adaptive Leadership

Teaching Officers How to Think verses Telling Them What To Think

Educating future leaders and officers in “how to think” (cognitive skills) takes longer and is intellectually far more expensive than industrially based task training, while task training requires resources like weapons, ranges, equipment, and special facilities that require training be done at established locations, requiring centralization. The good news is that recent studies by Dr. Bjork (UCLA) have discovered that theories about learning have been wrong.

Thinking Leaders, Leading Thinking People is the Adaptive Leaders Focus

I am often asked the question: what is adaptive leadership? My response is if you want your organization (police department), community and society to thrive in the rapidly changing world, adaptive leadership is for you.

Are You Serving Those You Lead?

The Harvard Business Review wrote a great piece this week How the U.S. Marines Encourage Service-Based Leadership by Angie Morgan and Courtney Lynch. I think the piece is fantastic and it spurred some great questions and discussion in police training circles.

Second Episode in This Podcast Series with Complete Emergency Managment: Leadership in Public Safety

In the first episode with Complete EM George and I discussed Active Shooters and After Action Reviews. In this second of two episodes Leadership in Public Safety George Whitney and I talk about the differences between management and leadership; mistakes and gross negligence; success and failure during response.

Shaping and Adapting: Using the Environment (The Last Hundred Yards) To Unlock the Power of Colonel John Boyd’s OODA Loop

In April of 2015 I posted an outstanding research paper from United States Marine Corps Major P.J. Tremblay titled “Shaping and Adapting: Unlocking the Power of Colonel John Boyd’s OODA Loop.” The paper is thoroughly researched and discusses numerous factors crucial in making sound decisions.

How Does The Last Hundred Yards, Enhance Tactical Responses to Crises?

The strategic and tactical mind takes into consideration all the key factors of a dynamic and competitive encounter. While we converge on the scene of a crises, we know from training we are supposed to set up tactically and make observations to get a feel for what's going on (orientation). Once we make a judgment about what we believe is going on we make decisions that help us gain the advantage before we take action. Hell we are taught the importance of tactical set ups and perimeter in the police academy.

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