Community Policing

Sir Robert Peels, Nine Key Principles of Policing: Fair and Impartial Policing Defined Back In 1829!

Defining the path to community policing is based on Sir Robert Peels, nine key principles of policing he offered up back in 1829. When reading these I cannot help but think all the time we in policing spend trying to re-invent the wheel of sound ethical, fair and impartial policing when all we really need to do is adapt what already exists to the current climate.

  • Principle 1 – “The basic mission for which the police exist is to prevent crime and disorder.”

Herman Goldstein, Fundamental Objectives of Policing: Are They Relevant Today? I Say Yes!

The fundamental objectives of policing (also referred to as the mission of the police or the core functions of policing) are the ultimate purposes for which police agencies have been created. Goldstein was one of a number of scholars who recognized and articulated the breadth and complexity of the police mission. He synthesized the understanding of the multiple objectives of the police in his seminal work; Policing a Free Society, a precursor to his writings on problem oriented policing.

Keeping The Peace in a Free Society Let Us Not Forget Why We Do What We Do

America’s greatest attribute is freedom. People have fought and died defending freedom. I am not just speaking of those that serve or have served in the military. I am also speaking of those fellow citizens standing up for individual rights, laid out in the United States Constitution. In policing a free society it is important that police never lose sight of and stay committed to Democratic values. That while we defend the homelands people from crime and disorder, we at the same time must uphold that which is dearest to us, the United States Constitution and what it attributes to freedom.

What is the Mission and Intent of Policing a Free Society?

The fundamental objectives of policing (also referred to as the mission of the police or the core functions of policing) are the ultimate purposes for which police agencies have been created. Goldstein was one of a number of scholars who recognized and articulated the breadth and complexity of the police mission. He synthesized his understanding of the multiple objectives of the police in his seminal work, Policing a Free Society, a precursor to his writings on problem oriented policing.

Sound of Silence A Tribute to Policing and All Those Who Serve The Homeland

This video was posted up on my FB Page from a friend. The link comes back to Behind the Badge OC. Behind the Badge OC highlights news from a public-safety perspective.

We cover crime and crime prevention. We track trends and share stories about the men and women who keep Orange County safe. And we offer commentary from law enforcement experts.

Thoughts on Policing a Free Society: Altering Public Expectations

“Policing is one of America’s most noble professions. The actions of any officer, in an instant, can impact an individual for life and even a community for generations. Given this realization, every police officer must be centered on what is important. Service, Justice, Fundamental Fairness. These are the foundational principles in which every police action must be grounded. The nobility of policing demands the noblest of character. ”Steven R. Covey

Thoughts on Policing a Free Society: Rethinking Widely Held Assumptions Regarding Police Fuction

"In order to make the police function more workable ,to reduce the conflicting pressures on the police, and to assure that future investments in police improvement will bring greater return, we must go back to fundamentals. We must rethink widely held assumptions regarding police function; recognize the discretion inherent in police work; and establish the values basic to policing.

Thoughts on Policing a Free Society: Our Failure to Concern Ourselves...

..."Our failure to concern ourselves sufficiently with the ambiguity in the police function and with the other conflicting pressures brought to bear upon the police has substantially reduced the potential effectiveness of the most common proposals for improving police operations. Beyond this, the continuing need for compromise that these pressures have create makes police officers unusually vulnerable to criticism, pressing them to take shelter in the police subculture.

We All Lose When it's Us Verses Them!

In this powerful WINx talk, retired Superintendent in Chief Daniel Linskey of the Boston Police Department talks about law enforcement relationships with the community and within our organizations. Chief Linskey was the incident commander for Boston PD during the city's response to the Boston Marathon Bombing and understands the meaning of community engagement.

His message: We all lose when it's us verses them!

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