Continuous Improvement

Devising Solutions to Complex Police Problems: How Can We Get Better?

Over the years of facilitating scenario based learning with police, I have continually evolved programs of instruction in a way that I feel based on input from, the students in class and other sources that focus their efforts on the development of people I know are using the techniques and reaching the outcomes they seek, when handling crisis situations.

Understanding Problems Range in Complexity and Designing Police Operations

“There are at least two kinds of games. One could be called finite, the other infinite. A finite game is played for the purpose of winning, an infinite game for the purpose of continuing to play.” ~James Carse, Finite and Infinite Games

When it comes to Police Training, When is Good Enough, Not Good Enough?

I read a candid and thoughtful article Have a Great Training Program? I want to know about it! By Jim Glennon  Most reading this will know Jim but I get a lot of non-cop followers as well so here a snippet of his background: Lt. Jim Glennon (ret.) is the owner and lead instructor for Calibre Press. He is a third-generation LEO, retired from the Lombard, Ill.

Police Officer Discretion…and Focusing Our Efforts on Better Outcomes

“While improvements in policing have usually resulted from revelations of wrongdoing or the documentation of inadequacies, it does not follow that public dissatisfaction has always produced change. With monotonous regularity, peaks of interest in the police have been followed at both national and local levels by the appointment of a group of citizens to examine the specific problem that has surfaced and to make recommendations for dealing with it. In the heat of the moment the appointment of such a group has often, by itself, been sufficient to reduce public anxiety.

The Art of Police Training is the Ability to Move Officers Through the Fog and Complexity of Human Interaction

The purpose of all police training is to develop officers that can solve societies complex problems. The fundamental objectives of policing (also referred to as the mission of the police or the core functions of policing) are the ultimate purposes for which police agencies have been created. Herman Goldstein was one of a number of scholars who recognized and articulated the breadth and complexity of the police mission.

Are You Serving Those You Lead?

The Harvard Business Review wrote a great piece this week How the U.S. Marines Encourage Service-Based Leadership by Angie Morgan and Courtney Lynch. I think the piece is fantastic and it spurred some great questions and discussion in police training circles.

Warriors vs. Praetorian Guard – Which Mindset Fits You Best? By Mike Ox

It’s been said, and I agree, that we are in the early stages of a renaissance of the warrior mindset.

This is due in part to the fact that we’re 14 years into the Global War on Terror, part due to movies, TV, and novels, and part because of the fact that computers and the internet have paved the way for the collection and analysis of large amounts of post-incident data that used to be impossible.

The refinements in training, tactics, and techniques have created an unprecedented number of warrior minds which has resulted in countless lives saved in battle.

Workplace Development Programs: Training? or Education? by Louis Hayes

The more I study and learn how humans complete tasks, solve problems, and seize opportunities, the more convinced I become we need to change the design of our human development programs – by accounting for the differences between training and education.

The Demand For Autodidacts – The Self-Taught in an Age of Shrinking Budgets by Patrick Van Horne

Here is another great piece by Patrick Van Horne of the CP Journal and author of the outstanding book Left of Bang. Here Patrick discusses the importance of Autodidacts' (self learners). It always been my preference to seek those people out who have a growth mindset. A willingness to continually learn. Continually improve.

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