Coup d'oeil

Sizing Up Situations Is A Skill, We Need To Develop

"The importance of recognizing the underlying factors and influences in play cannot be overstated. Imagine, for example, the advantages of recognizing the significance of the element of surprise as a condition of success for the Branch Davidian raid or the futility of a surround and call-out at Columbine. Clearly, some understanding of the nature of what is occurring is of great advantage." ~Sid Heal

Why Does Understanding The OODA Loop Matter to Cops?

Don Vandergriff of Adaptive Leader talks about John Boyd's OODA Loop, why it matters and the implications and opportunities for adaptive leaders in any organization, including the police.

Guest Post by Michael G. Moore: Boyd's Snowmobile ...or what made Alexander “The Great”

The whole point of observation in the context of policing is so that we are able to make sense of what’s going on in real time rapidly changing conditions. We make situational assessments in the midst of uncertainty as circumstances ebb and flow through our minds that we interpret based on our life experience and the unfolding conditions we now find ourselves in. The patterns we recognize make sense to us and hence we are capable to responding accordingly. However what if the patterns we are observing does not make sense?

What Do OODA Loop’s Mean to the Street Cop, Wanting To Become “World Class” Tacticians?

Three officers respond at 3AM to the call of a disturbance. When they arrive, there are three people present, two males and a female. One male is intoxicated; I will only focus on him for the purpose of this example. Intoxicated male is spoken to by responding officers. They tell him to call it a night and to go to bed and sleep it off. He says he will and turns to go into the house. The officers continue gathering information for the incident report.

Deciding Under Pressure…and Fast: You Need to Understand the Concept of “Coup d’oeil”


"This facile coup d'oeil of the General, this simple art of forming notions, this personification of the whole action of War, is so entirely and completely the soul of the right method of conducting War, that no other but this broad way is it possible to conceive that freedom of the mind which is indispensable if it is to dominate events, not be overpowered by them." ~Carl von Clausewitz

P1 Column: Patterns of behavior, officer safety, and 'the rule of opposites'

Part One: We recognize opposites — day as compared to night, happy compared to sad, failure versus success, peace as opposed to war, and safety counter to danger

You’re assigned to handle an emotionally disturbed person — a female — threatening suicide, according to a person who called dispatch. The location and assailant are known to you — you’ve had frequent interact with this individual, at this location, for the same type of problem.

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