Friction in Decision Making

Ugly Police Force: Misunderstandings of Law & Human Factors by Lou Hayes

Videos of police officers using force. Police incidents involving citizens with mental illnesses. Social media instantaneously spreading opinions and public verdicts. The "no comment" policy in police media relations. This combination makes it virtually impossible to build community trust and understanding.

I am amazed by the growth of four seemingly unrelated aspects affecting my profession:

  • the number of video cameras capturing police officers' actions,

Stoning The Gatekeepers: Is It Not Time Society Attempts To Better Understand Police Use of Force?

Police Use of Deadly Force: Should There be a Different Standard For Cops?

“From the tiny town of Colrain at the Vermont border to the siren-pierced streets of Boston, state and local police have shot and killed 73 people across Massachusetts over the last 12 years. The deadliest year was 2013, when 12 people were killed. Every completed killing investigation found the police were justified, in using deadly force; only three of the cases were presented to a grand jury or judicial inquest to determine if a crime was committed.”

Why Does Understanding The OODA Loop Matter to Cops?

Don Vandergriff of Adaptive Leader talks about John Boyd's OODA Loop, why it matters and the implications and opportunities for adaptive leaders in any organization, including the police.

Understanding the OODA Loop by Derek Stephens

Photo courtesy of iStockPhoto.com.
Photo courtesy of iStockPhoto.com.

The key to acting more quickly than your adversary is to make it an unconscious response.

Flatenning the Decision Cycle in Tactical Units

I was just turned on to a great website "An Enlightened Soldier" a site dedicated to the study of war, warfare and leadership. In this piece they discuss mission command, its 6 principles and then a simple method on how to improve individual and hence organizational OODA Loops. Stay Oriented! Fred

The Missing Piece of NIMS: Teaching Incident Commanders How to Function in the Edge of Chaos by Police Chief, Cynthia Renaud

The Homeland Security Affairs article "The Missing Piece of NIMS: Teaching Incident Commanders How to Function in the Edge of Chaos" by Folsom California Police Chief, Cynthia Renaud is a must read article for law enforcement.

From Police One 3 techniques for controlling your brain with Chief Joel F. Shults, Ed.D.

If you see a snake in the woods, your linking brain can potentially “see” every twig was a snake for the duration of your long walk home

For a layman like me, a general understanding of brain function can be simplified as consisting of a lizard brain, linking brain, and logic brain.

Tactical Decision Games to Increase Speed and Maturity of Problem Solving: The Lessons Learned

“Confronted with a task, and having less information available than is needed to perform that task, an organization may react in either of two ways. One is to increase its information-processing capacity, the other to design the organization, and indeed the task itself, in such a way as to enable it to operate on the basis of less information. These approaches are exhaustive; no others are conceivable. A failure to adopt one or the other will automatically result in a drop in the level of performance.” —Martin van Creveld, Command in War

Police One Column: 13 questions to answer in 2013: What has 2012 taught you about officer safety and effectiveness?

As this is the last week of the year, many of us are understandably looking back at the past 12 months and discussing what we consider to be the significant events of 2012.

In most cases, such discussions tend to focus on the numerous challenges and upheavals we’ve either watched from afar or witnessed firsthand — from police response to crisis to police officers being ambushed and killed in the line of duty.

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