Guest Post

Guest Post: Bad Boys What You Gonna Do When You’re Wearing Blue: Police Behaving Badly

Noah Kovacs has over ten years experience in the legal field. He has since retired early and enjoys blogging about small business law, legal marketing, and everything in between. He recently purchased his first cabin and spends his free time remodeling its kitchen for his family. Twitter: @NoahKovacs

Guest Post: Adaptive Decision-Making by Sid Heal

All crises are fraught with uncertainty. While uncertainty must be reduced to the maximum possible extent, it can never be completely eliminated. Accordingly, efforts will always be necessary to deal with the unexpected. Effective leaders are compelled to continually improvise, innovate and adapt to ever-changing circumstances. The most successful leaders are able to both anticipate a change and promptly deal with it. Developing these types of leaders then becomes an imperative.

“More Better,” Ideals, and To Be or To Do: Guest Post by Scott Shipman

Several years ago I frequented a barber shop owned by a Vietnamese immigrant named, Tom. Tom had been in the United States for over a decade, but hadn’t mastered very much English. However, that didn’t seem to be holding him back as he had/has a thriving business, and does a good job at a good price. The signature conclusion of Tom’s haircuts was rotate the barber chair so the customer could look in the mirror and either approve or disapprove of his work.

Learning Like an Expert: A Guest Post by Marshall Wallace

This guest post is from a fellow Boydian thinker, and friend Marshall Wallace. Marshall had mentioned at one of our Boyd and Beyond Boston meetings that he was working on a paper "Learning Like an Expert" below are his insights into what we need to do to create and nurture critical thinkers and problem solvers, this includes those of us in law enforcement.

Marshall explains There are four tools that the Training of Trainers needs to model. This modeling represents, on the one hand, how to gain experience, while on the other it also shows how to continue self-training.

Guest Post by Michael G. Moore: Boyd's Snowmobile ...or what made Alexander “The Great”

The whole point of observation in the context of policing is so that we are able to make sense of what’s going on in real time rapidly changing conditions. We make situational assessments in the midst of uncertainty as circumstances ebb and flow through our minds that we interpret based on our life experience and the unfolding conditions we now find ourselves in. The patterns we recognize make sense to us and hence we are capable to responding accordingly. However what if the patterns we are observing does not make sense?

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