Louis Hayes

Workplace Development Programs: Training? or Education? by Louis Hayes

The more I study and learn how humans complete tasks, solve problems, and seize opportunities, the more convinced I become we need to change the design of our human development programs – by accounting for the differences between training and education.

Open Letter to President's Task Force on Policing by Louis Hayes

The following is text-only version of my official written testimony submitted to President Obama's Task Force on 21st Century Policing. In it, I boldly recommend The Illinois Model be considered as a framework for police training and operations in the United States.

05 FEB 2015

Ugly Police Force: Misunderstandings of Law & Human Factors by Lou Hayes

Videos of police officers using force. Police incidents involving citizens with mental illnesses. Social media instantaneously spreading opinions and public verdicts. The "no comment" policy in police media relations. This combination makes it virtually impossible to build community trust and understanding.

I am amazed by the growth of four seemingly unrelated aspects affecting my profession:

  • the number of video cameras capturing police officers' actions,

CASE STUDY: Ferguson Missouri shooting incident and aftermath by Louis Hayes

In the last few hours, I have fielded several requests to make comments on the Ferguson Missouri situation. Most of the interest arose from a revitalized post on analyzing the NYPD Glenn Broadnax incident. Here is my highly abbreviated analysis and setup of the situation in Ferguson, from a complete outside perspective.

Incident Strategy and Tactics (Part 2): The Importance of Teaching Your People How to Change Their Own Diaper

This is a followup to Part One, where I contended the bulk of police training wrongly focused on tactics at the cost of neglecting more critical strategic issues. However, there is only so much a police officer can do to control or influence a situation in the field. Since not everything goes to plan, officers must have the skills and abilities to fix a situation when it goes bad.

Incident Strategy and Tactics: The Baby Diaper Analogy

Is it more important to be a kick-ass gunfighter? ...or to have the wisdom and understanding on how to stay out of a gunfight in the first place? And on which of these things should police instructors being focusing their efforts? This debate isn't limited to only the use of police deadly force; it's one that permeates law enforcement education and training as a whole.

The Doctor in SWAT School (and What His Performance Says About Police Culture)

This is the lesson of a trauma/emergency room physician and his two weeks in police SWAT training. His performance in school caused me to re-examine the training and education I had been giving to police officers...and how culture might be more important than everything else.

Incident Command: the big picture by Louis Hayes

Over the past few weeks, I have been re-engineering Police Incident Command according to The Illinois Model law enforcement operations system (LEOpSys). Most of the ideas aren't earth-shattering, but they suggest some small adjustments to the nationally-mandated program. The first several posts lay some foundation into our vision of what IC should be.

Incident Command: the team cohesion aspect of the SitRep

Over the past few weeks, I have been re-engineering Police Incident Command according to The Illinois Model law enforcement operations system (LEOpSys). Most of the ideas aren't earth-shattering, but they suggest some small adjustments to the nationally-mandated program. The first several posts lay some foundation into our vision of what IC should be.

Incident Command: Communicating the Situation and Location By Louis Hayes

Over the past few weeks, I have been re-engineering Police Incident Command according to The Illinois Model law enforcement operations system (LEOpSys). Most of the ideas aren't earth-shattering, but they suggest some small adjustments to the nationally-mandated program. The first several posts lay some foundation into our vision of what IC should be.

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