Problem Oriented Policing

Thoughts on Policing a Free Society: Rethinking Widely Held Assumptions Regarding Police Fuction

"In order to make the police function more workable ,to reduce the conflicting pressures on the police, and to assure that future investments in police improvement will bring greater return, we must go back to fundamentals. We must rethink widely held assumptions regarding police function; recognize the discretion inherent in police work; and establish the values basic to policing.

Thoughts on Policing a Free Society: Our Failure to Concern Ourselves...

..."Our failure to concern ourselves sufficiently with the ambiguity in the police function and with the other conflicting pressures brought to bear upon the police has substantially reduced the potential effectiveness of the most common proposals for improving police operations. Beyond this, the continuing need for compromise that these pressures have create makes police officers unusually vulnerable to criticism, pressing them to take shelter in the police subculture.

Thoughts on Policing a Free Society

"Most efforts to improve police functioning have gone forward on the assumption that prevention of crime and the apprehension of criminals are the primary tasks of th police. But these assumptions have been based more on the mythology surrounding policing than upon accurate assessment of what it is that police do. The police themselves perpetuate this myth.

For Meaningful Lasting Results, Get Into the Weeds…and Identify Root Causes

fishing weeds

I have over the years often heard the term “we need to get out of the weeds and solve this problem” I have even heard “I don’t want to hear the problem give me the solutions!” Whatever happened to Charles Kettering‘s idea that; “A problem well stated is a problem half-solved?”

Guest Post by Tyana Daley: Developing Law Enforcement Leaders and Nurturing Smart Thinkers

In the years to come, police agencies will likely encounter a heightened need for solid leadership as a combination of factors challenges law enforcement. Senior-level law enforcement officials will retire, creating a vacuum in the upper ranks and a shortage of experienced leadership talent.

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