Published Articles

An Officer’s Principal Weapon is His Mind: Professional Development In Policing

Professional police development is designed to develop creative, thinking officers, who will eventually become leaders, leading thinking officers. My definition of a professional police development is not solely about formal education although this is part of it. My definition is focused more on professional development and job focused training. Professional police education is also very much about the autodidacts those self learners who strive to reach high levels of professionalism on their own.

Watching Boston “Work Together” Made Me Proud to Be a Police Officer

People of Boston

“It’s a proud day to be a Boston police officer,” Police Commissioner Edward F. Davis told his force over the radio moments after the arrest. “Thank you all.”

How shift debriefings can improve officer safety Published at P1


We must become more deliberate, more disciplined, and more thorough in our approach to learning and teaching

As cops, we often cry loudly about the lack of training in our profession. I am guilty of it myself.

However, while we whine about the seemingly lack of interest in ongoing training, we also miss the opportunities to train and learn from the everyday lessons available to us.

Those lessons that come from every call we respond to and every shift we work.

There’s No Magic Here

Police One Column: 13 questions to answer in 2013: What has 2012 taught you about officer safety and effectiveness?

As this is the last week of the year, many of us are understandably looking back at the past 12 months and discussing what we consider to be the significant events of 2012.

In most cases, such discussions tend to focus on the numerous challenges and upheavals we’ve either watched from afar or witnessed firsthand — from police response to crisis to police officers being ambushed and killed in the line of duty.

Deciding Under Pressure…and Fast: You Need to Understand the Concept of “Coup d’oeil”


"This facile coup d'oeil of the General, this simple art of forming notions, this personification of the whole action of War, is so entirely and completely the soul of the right method of conducting War, that no other but this broad way is it possible to conceive that freedom of the mind which is indispensable if it is to dominate events, not be overpowered by them." ~Carl von Clausewitz

International Law Enforcement Trainers & Educators Association Published: Mindset and Winning: About Much More than Words

The fall edition of the International Law Enforcement Educators and Trainers Association Journal, has published an article I wrote; Mindset and Winning: About Much More than Words.

Latest P1 Column: The anatomy of victory (part two): Victory at minimal cost

In part one of this two-part series, we asked and answered a lot of important questions about our preparedness to win. If you haven’t yet read part one, please do so before reading one, for it is the foundation on which that what follows is built.

The anatomy of victory (part one): What does it take to win?

Winning on the street comes in many forms and means different things to different people.

Winning in law enforcement encounters can be gaining voluntary compliance through communication and negotiation or it can ebb and flow back and forth through a vast array of outcomes up to and including deadly force. Winning to the cop means one thing, while to an adversary winning on his terms is quite another.

P1 Column: Situational awareness, officer safety, and 'the explorer mentality'

Part Two: The exploring officer takes responsibility for the strategic choices of routes and objectives on his journey into the unknown

P1 Column: Patterns of behavior, officer safety, and 'the rule of opposites'

Part One: We recognize opposites — day as compared to night, happy compared to sad, failure versus success, peace as opposed to war, and safety counter to danger

You’re assigned to handle an emotionally disturbed person — a female — threatening suicide, according to a person who called dispatch. The location and assailant are known to you — you’ve had frequent interact with this individual, at this location, for the same type of problem.

Syndicate content