Strategic and Tactical Mindset

Conflict and Crisis are Full of Friction: The Force That Makes the Apparently Easy so Difficult

Friction in decision making s its often portrayed in conflict as a simple concept to understand. Viewing a video tape over and over and 20/20 hindsight, seem to have this impact on those watching media reports or nowadays, officer patrol car or body cameras.  But in practice, because of the countless factors that impinge on it, dealing with conflict becomes extremely difficult.

Is Your Purpose in Life Based on Self Awareness and Strength of Character or Are You Just Following the Crowd?

"A man's true greatness lies in the consciousness of an honest purpose in life, founded on a just estimate of himself and everything else, on frequent self-examinations, and a steady obedience to the rule which he knows to be right, without troubling himself about what others may think or say, or whether they do or do not that which he thinks and says and does."   - Marcus Aurelius

Teaching Officers How to Think verses Telling Them What To Think

Educating future leaders and officers in “how to think” (cognitive skills) takes longer and is intellectually far more expensive than industrially based task training, while task training requires resources like weapons, ranges, equipment, and special facilities that require training be done at established locations, requiring centralization. The good news is that recent studies by Dr. Bjork (UCLA) have discovered that theories about learning have been wrong.

Vehicle Stops Strategies and Tactics: Being Safe and Effective Is About Options, Not Best Practices

“Direct experience is inherently too limited to form an adequate foundation either for theory or for application.  At the best it produces an atmosphere that is of value in drying and hardening of thought. The greater value of indirect experience lies in its greater variety and extent. History is universal experience, the experience not of another, but of many others under manifold conditions.” ~B. H. Liddell Hart

Shaping and Adapting: Using the Environment (The Last Hundred Yards) To Unlock the Power of Colonel John Boyd’s OODA Loop

In April of 2015 I posted an outstanding research paper from United States Marine Corps Major P.J. Tremblay titled “Shaping and Adapting: Unlocking the Power of Colonel John Boyd’s OODA Loop.” The paper is thoroughly researched and discusses numerous factors crucial in making sound decisions.

How Does The Last Hundred Yards, Enhance Tactical Responses to Crises?

The strategic and tactical mind takes into consideration all the key factors of a dynamic and competitive encounter. While we converge on the scene of a crises, we know from training we are supposed to set up tactically and make observations to get a feel for what's going on (orientation). Once we make a judgment about what we believe is going on we make decisions that help us gain the advantage before we take action. Hell we are taught the importance of tactical set ups and perimeter in the police academy.

Complacency and False Sense of Urgency: Why We Fail to Take Advantage of The Last Hundred Yards?

The problem is complacency. We have all seen it. Yet we underestimate its power and its prevalence. Highly destructive complacency is, in fact, all around us, including in places where people would deny it, deny it, and deny it still more.

The Last Hundred Yards: Operate On Blind Luck or Win Consistently?

"If you are lucky and trust in luck alone, even your successes reduce you to the defensive; if you are unlucky you are already there." ~Frederick the Great

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