Decision Making Critiques

Boyd and Beyond Boston 2013: Balancing Pursuasion and Force in The Moral, Mental and Physical Dimensions of Conflict

"Avoid war by every possible means in all possible circumstances, but always act as is it might start at any time. Gather intelligence on the enemy and his mentality, and monitor his movements continuously. Campaign vigorously, both offensively and defensively, but attack mostly with small units; emphasize patrolling, raiding, and skirmishing rather than all out attacks. Replace battles of attrition with the "nonbattle" of maneuver. Strive to end wars successfully by recruiting allies to change the overall balance of power. Subversion is the best path to victory.

Can You Become An Effective Tactical Decision Maker By Making A Fool Of Yourself?

I received a newsletter from Brian Willis of Winning Mind Training, that offers some great advice on not being afraid to make a fool, of yourself. Yes that's correct; in the risk averse culture of law enforcement he recommends not being afraid to make mistakes. In my view this is sound advice because making mistakes and then applying the lessons learned to become better is what it leads to. The current state of things in law enforcement when it comes to mistakes is all too often to punish for them.

Shift Debriefings: How Can We Be More Deliberate, More Disciplined, and More Thorough in our Approach to Learning?

As cops we often cry loudly about the lack of training in our profession (I am guilty myself). However while we complain and whine about the seemingly lack of interest in ongoing training we also miss the opportunities to train and learn from the everyday lessons available to us. Those lessons that come from every call we respond to and every shift we work.

How Do Adaptive Leaders Think?

Raising the Bar: Creating and Nurturing Adaptability to Deal With the Changing Face of War, by Don Vandergriff, is a book anyone who knows me has heard me speak of and highly recommend over the years. The copy I own is highlighted throughout and the information contained in this powerful little book fits right into the law enforcement profession. I was just going back through the book this morning and wanted to share with you a section from the book, How do adaptive leaders think?

What has 2011 Taught You About Officer Safety and Effectiveness?

“I learned that good judgment comes from experience and that experience grows out of mistakes.” ~General of the Army Omar N. Bradley

Police Militarization, Professionalism, and the Balance of Persuasion and Force

By Fred Leland and Alex Olesker

“The strategic success of the Byzantine empire was of a different order than any number of tactical victories or defeats: it was a sustained ability, century after century, to generate disproportionate power from whatever military strength could be mustered, by combining it with all the arts of persuasion, guided by superior information.” ~Edward Luttwak

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