Decision Making

Deadly Force: Have We Lost Our Senses? Guest Post by Louis Hayes

You are sitting in one of the finest restaurants in your city - the sort of place where the a-la-carte side dishes easily push the bill into triple digits. There's reminiscing with old friends at your table. Before you know it, you realize the discussion was so captivating that you haven't tasted your meal since the first bite. How the heck did a $50 slab of meat sneak its way past your taste buds? Better yet, how did you not notice your boss sit down at the next table over...30 minutes ago?

Unconventional Crises, Unconventional Responses: Reforming Leadership in the Age of Catastrophic Crises and “Hyper complexity”

“Most “tabletop” simulation exercises follow a common pattern. Organizers prepare a detailed scenario ahead of the event. After its premises are laid out and participants set to work, new information is released on a regular basis, indicating developments brought about in part by the participants’ decisions. In their response, participants are expected to conform to a set plan, which the simulation aims to test and rehearse.

Guest Post: Adaptive Decision-Making by Sid Heal

All crises are fraught with uncertainty. While uncertainty must be reduced to the maximum possible extent, it can never be completely eliminated. Accordingly, efforts will always be necessary to deal with the unexpected. Effective leaders are compelled to continually improvise, innovate and adapt to ever-changing circumstances. The most successful leaders are able to both anticipate a change and promptly deal with it. Developing these types of leaders then becomes an imperative.

“More Better,” Ideals, and To Be or To Do: Guest Post by Scott Shipman

Several years ago I frequented a barber shop owned by a Vietnamese immigrant named, Tom. Tom had been in the United States for over a decade, but hadn’t mastered very much English. However, that didn’t seem to be holding him back as he had/has a thriving business, and does a good job at a good price. The signature conclusion of Tom’s haircuts was rotate the barber chair so the customer could look in the mirror and either approve or disapprove of his work.

Learning Like an Expert: A Guest Post by Marshall Wallace

This guest post is from a fellow Boydian thinker, and friend Marshall Wallace. Marshall had mentioned at one of our Boyd and Beyond Boston meetings that he was working on a paper "Learning Like an Expert" below are his insights into what we need to do to create and nurture critical thinkers and problem solvers, this includes those of us in law enforcement.

Marshall explains There are four tools that the Training of Trainers needs to model. This modeling represents, on the one hand, how to gain experience, while on the other it also shows how to continue self-training.

What Represents a High Level of Professionalism?


“The essential thing is action. Action has three stages: the decision born of thought, the order or preparation for execution, and the execution itself. All three stages are governed by the will. The will is rooted in character, and for the man of action character is of more critical importance than intellect. Intellect without will is worthless, will without intellect is dangerous.” ~Hans von Seeckt

Guest Post by Michael G. Moore: Boyd's Snowmobile ...or what made Alexander “The Great”

The whole point of observation in the context of policing is so that we are able to make sense of what’s going on in real time rapidly changing conditions. We make situational assessments in the midst of uncertainty as circumstances ebb and flow through our minds that we interpret based on our life experience and the unfolding conditions we now find ourselves in. The patterns we recognize make sense to us and hence we are capable to responding accordingly. However what if the patterns we are observing does not make sense?

Learning to Adapt With A Professional Reading Program


The Professional Reading Program is intended to save leaders that most precious commodity - time.

This post was inspired by a post at the Business Insider: General James 'Mad Dog' Mattis Email About Being 'Too Busy To Read' Is A Must-Read The General was asked by a colleague about the importance of reading for officers who often exclaimed they were too busy to read. The general’s response:

Guest Post by Tyana Daley: Developing Law Enforcement Leaders and Nurturing Smart Thinkers

In the years to come, police agencies will likely encounter a heightened need for solid leadership as a combination of factors challenges law enforcement. Senior-level law enforcement officials will retire, creating a vacuum in the upper ranks and a shortage of experienced leadership talent.

What Do OODA Loop’s Mean to the Street Cop, Wanting To Become “World Class” Tacticians?

Three officers respond at 3AM to the call of a disturbance. When they arrive, there are three people present, two males and a female. One male is intoxicated; I will only focus on him for the purpose of this example. Intoxicated male is spoken to by responding officers. They tell him to call it a night and to go to bed and sleep it off. He says he will and turns to go into the house. The officers continue gathering information for the incident report.

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