Decision Making

Deciding Under Pressure…and Fast: You Need to Understand the Concept of “Coup d’oeil”


"This facile coup d'oeil of the General, this simple art of forming notions, this personification of the whole action of War, is so entirely and completely the soul of the right method of conducting War, that no other but this broad way is it possible to conceive that freedom of the mind which is indispensable if it is to dominate events, not be overpowered by them." ~Carl von Clausewitz

How Do Adaptive Leaders Think?

Raising the Bar: Creating and Nurturing Adaptability to Deal With the Changing Face of War, by Don Vandergriff, is a book anyone who knows me has heard me speak of and highly recommend over the years. The copy I own is highlighted throughout and the information contained in this powerful little book fits right into the law enforcement profession. I was just going back through the book this morning and wanted to share with you a section from the book, How do adaptive leaders think?

Capt Evan Bradley on Boyd, Adaptability and Understanding the Bigger Picture in Conflict

Adaptive Leaders has another outstanding conversation. This one is with, Capt Bradley from the Marine Corps Expeditionary Warfare School talks about Col John Boyd ideas, as they apply to rapid decision making and getting inside your adversaries OODA loop, creating friction and slowing down their decision making abilities. Giving you the initiative!

Col GI Wilson on Boyd, Bureaucracy, Insight, Imagination, Intent and Implementation

In this 11 minute video Col. G I Wilson, USMC (Ret) talks to Adaptive Leader at the 2012 Boyd and Beyond Conference about John Boyd, his ideas and how they apply to leadership.

Latest P1 Column: The anatomy of victory (part two): Victory at minimal cost

In part one of this two-part series, we asked and answered a lot of important questions about our preparedness to win. If you haven’t yet read part one, please do so before reading one, for it is the foundation on which that what follows is built.

The anatomy of victory (part one): What does it take to win?

Winning on the street comes in many forms and means different things to different people.

Winning in law enforcement encounters can be gaining voluntary compliance through communication and negotiation or it can ebb and flow back and forth through a vast array of outcomes up to and including deadly force. Winning to the cop means one thing, while to an adversary winning on his terms is quite another.

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