Full Spectrum Policing

What was Boyd Thinking and...What Can Policing Learn From It?

I just had to share this piece and great illustration on John Boyd's work from Chet Richards's site Slightly East of New. All too often in policing we play follow the follower when it comes to new ideas, strategy and tactics.

Pete’s Combat Wish List Pt 2: Mental Models, Mistakes, Reflection and Learning on the Fly

Mental models are the images, assumptions, and stories which we carry in our minds of ourselves, other people, institutions, and every aspect of the world. Like a pane of glass framing and subtly distorting our vision, mental models determine what we see. Human beings cannot navigate through the complex environments of our world without cognitive “mental maps”; and all of these mental maps, by definition, are flawed in some way.

Pete’s Wish List for Combat Warriors. Perhaps Some Lessons for Poliicng as Well?

I love this wish list by Pete Turner. It fits policing as well, as what I am teaching cops this year Procedural Justice and Combatting Violent Extremism. His take on emotional verse cultural intelligence is spot on and describes as well what we police must consider and how we police must be more deliberate in our policing efforts, to be more effective.

Experiential Learning a Big Part of The New Recruit Officer Course In Massachusetts: Looks Promising!

I attended a meeting today on the new Recruit Officer Course and was very excited to see what the Municipal Police Training Committee (MPTC) working together with State Subject Matter Experts along with John Blum of Force Concepts a consulting company based out of North Carolina and Tim Bonadies Founder of Law Enforcement Lea

Understanding Problems Range in Complexity and Designing Police Operations

“There are at least two kinds of games. One could be called finite, the other infinite. A finite game is played for the purpose of winning, an infinite game for the purpose of continuing to play.” ~James Carse, Finite and Infinite Games

Police Officer Discretion…and Focusing Our Efforts on Better Outcomes

“While improvements in policing have usually resulted from revelations of wrongdoing or the documentation of inadequacies, it does not follow that public dissatisfaction has always produced change. With monotonous regularity, peaks of interest in the police have been followed at both national and local levels by the appointment of a group of citizens to examine the specific problem that has surfaced and to make recommendations for dealing with it. In the heat of the moment the appointment of such a group has often, by itself, been sufficient to reduce public anxiety.

Brian Willis Interviews Yours Truly on Teaching Adaptive Leadership

I had the opportunity to be interviewed by Police trainer Brian Willis of the Excellence in Training Academy on the topic of Teaching Adaptive Leadership to police.

Podcast: I sit down with George Whitney of Complete EM and discuss: Active Shooters and After Actions

George Whitney of Complete EM each week speaks with people making a difference in emergency management. They talk about what works, what doesn't, how to work efficiently, and how to get it done with maximum effect. In this podcast ACTIVE SHOOTERS AND AFTER ACTIONS I speak with George about police response to active shooter incidents.

Informative Fair and Impartial Podcast: Do the legal rules for using deadly force, still make sense?

I found the Criminal Injustice with David A. Harris page today and listened to Episode 32 Do the legal rules for using deadly force, set by the Supreme Court in the 1980s, still make sense? Do they protect the officer and the public, or is it time to change how police make the decision to take a life? I found the discussion between David A.

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