Lessons Learned

Podcast: I sit down with George Whitney of Complete EM and discuss: Active Shooters and After Actions

George Whitney of Complete EM each week speaks with people making a difference in emergency management. They talk about what works, what doesn't, how to work efficiently, and how to get it done with maximum effect. In this podcast ACTIVE SHOOTERS AND AFTER ACTIONS I speak with George about police response to active shooter incidents.

After Action Review on The Christopher Dorner Incident

la-police-shootings Dorner

Police agencies showed remarkable skill and courage during the manhunt for cop-killer Christopher Dorner in California last year, but there were also potentially deadly shortcomings in the response, according to a new report.

Don’t Fear Failure; Instead Make Failure Your Classroom

Faulure

“Failure = Normal = Good. ("Reward excellent failure. Punish mediocre success." "Fail faster. Succeed sooner." "Fail. Forward. Fast.") ~Tom Peters

Want to get better and be safer? Debrief!

Several months back I discussed in a blog post the importance of debriefing or after action review (AAR) and how we must become more deliberate, more disciplined, and more thorough in our approach to learning and teaching.

As cops, we often cry loudly about the lack of training in our profession. I am guilty of it myself.

Leadership 101: Let your troops learn from mistakes By Vance "Fox" Rosen

Often we fail to give the big picture to our subordinates and instead guide each and every phase of an operation

I heard a great story the other day. I don't know where it came from, so I can't give proper credit, but it isn't mine.

A commander received three new lieutenants and wanted to see what they were made of. He told them that they had all day to come up with a mission order to put up a flagpole.

He told them that they would each have a flagpole, basic tools, a sergeant, and a platoon.

The Only Acceptable Mission Order

How shift debriefings can improve officer safety Published at P1


We must become more deliberate, more disciplined, and more thorough in our approach to learning and teaching

As cops, we often cry loudly about the lack of training in our profession. I am guilty of it myself.

However, while we whine about the seemingly lack of interest in ongoing training, we also miss the opportunities to train and learn from the everyday lessons available to us.

Those lessons that come from every call we respond to and every shift we work.

There’s No Magic Here

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