OODA Loop

Why The OODA Loop Is Forever By Dan Grazier


Boyd Cycle the real one

John Boyd forever changed the way the United States fights wars, both on the ground and in the air. This is rather impressive considering his own limited battlefield experience, as he just missed World War II and barely caught the end of the Korean War.

Podcast from Professional Military Education: John Boyd, Maneuver Warfare, and Marine Corps Doctrinal Publication-1

I listened to a great podcast over at the Professional Military Education site, John Boyd, Maneuver Warfare and MCDP-1 Warfighting which I feel will add great value for those wanting to understand Boyd's ideas, what maneuver actually is and how its used to gain position of advantage and get inside the mind of an adversary. This is part 1 of a 2 part series.

Police Responses Demands Constant and Repeated Action...Throughout the Tactical Encounter

I listened to a great podcast this morning on John Boyd and Maneuver Warfare which lead me to a great article by the guest Major Ian Brown titled Opening the Loop in which he explains the importance of being able to open up the OODA Loop when according with an adversary. This is a very important concept to understand and be able to apply in policing as well.

Col John Boyd's Patterns of Conflict Expanded to Policing Part 2: Don't Just Be a Reactor..Be a Shaper Too!

In Part 2 of this video series Boyd continues with his idea, what he calls a "New Conception" of fast transients O-O-D-A Loops that lead to outmaneuvering an adversary. The idea of fast transients suggests that, in order to win, we should operate at a faster tempo or rhythm than our adversaries—or, better yet, get inside adversary’s observation-orientation-decision-action time cycle or loop.

Wrestling With Delayed and Immediate Entry, Solo and Team Tactics...Are We Really Expecting All to Go as Rehersed?

I was out in the western part of Massachusetts teaching an in-service training class to a group of about 50 police officers. These cops are from small towns and often work their towns alone. No back-up immediately available! A conversation during class took place that sparked some debate on immediate versus delayed, solo versus team entry tactics and which is the best practice for dealing with ongoing threats such as, an active shooter, terrorist attack, or ambushes. Is immediate entry and a solo response always the way to go, or do 2, 3 and 4-man techniques still apply?

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