Keeping The Peace in a Free Society Let Us Not Forget Why We Do What We Do

America’s greatest attribute is freedom. People have fought and died defending freedom. I am not just speaking of those that serve or have served in the military. I am also speaking of those fellow citizens standing up for individual rights, laid out in the United States Constitution. In policing a free society it is important that police never lose sight of and stay committed to Democratic values. That while we defend the homelands people from crime and disorder, we at the same time must uphold that which is dearest to us, the United States Constitution and what it attributes to freedom.

Types of Cases

Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man …" Sir Francis Bacon

The Case Method Project of the Marine Corps University employs two types of cases: the “conference-style case” and the “Harvard-style case.” The heart of each type of case – a decision made by a leader in a specific real-life situation – is the same. They differ, however, in the way that students make sense of the context of the decision.

Report: Deadly Calls And Fatal Encounters

In 2015, the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF) entered into a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice COPS office to study officer line-of-duty deaths.

Five-Year Study of Police Officer Deaths: RoboCops or Guardians?


The study below from the Department of Justice and the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund provides vital data as to protecting the safety of police officers. Both should be congratulated for the valuable effort.

Our Observations

The role of humility in the Socratic method by Bruce Ivar Gudmundsson

In the spring of 2010, while I was teaching my first case-based undergraduate course, a student paid me an unusual compliment. “Professor,” he said, “you are more humble than most academics.”

Keeping the Peace

I am seriously troubled by what's going on currently in this country when it comes to the killing of police. I have been policing for 30 years and the current climate is the most negative I have experienced during this time. I know throughout the history of policing we have seen more cops killed in the line of duty like the 1970s when we say 200-280 per year. Prior to the 1970s, the 1930s we saw numbers of officers killed in the line of duty total over 300. So despite this being the worse climate towards police I have seen our history says that is not the case.

Experiential Learning Defined

A great piece that asks the question; What is experiential learning? from the University of Texas Faculty Innovation Center. This is an important piece for us trainers because how we develop people in the policing profession is paramount to their effectiveness on the street as they make decision under pressure on the street. The old check the box training does not cut it and quite frankly it never has.

How We Learn Versus How We Think We Learn

Robert Bjork, Distinguished Research Professor in the UCLA Department of Psychology, shares insights from his work as a renowned expert on human learning. Bjork has been studying learning and memory for more than four decades. Recorded on 02/17/2016. I just loved this video because it shows the serious gap of how we learn versus how we think we learn. Important for police officers and police trainer as well as police leaders to understand!

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