Blogs

Keeping the Peace

I am seriously troubled by what's going on currently in this country when it comes to the killing of police. I have been policing for 30 years and the current climate is the most negative I have experienced during this time. I know throughout the history of policing we have seen more cops killed in the line of duty like the 1970s when we say 200-280 per year. Prior to the 1970s, the 1930s we saw numbers of officers killed in the line of duty total over 300. So despite this being the worse climate towards police I have seen our history says that is not the case.

Experiential Learning Defined

A great piece that asks the question; What is experiential learning? from the University of Texas Faculty Innovation Center. This is an important piece for us trainers because how we develop people in the policing profession is paramount to their effectiveness on the street as they make decision under pressure on the street. The old check the box training does not cut it and quite frankly it never has.

How We Learn Versus How We Think We Learn

Robert Bjork, Distinguished Research Professor in the UCLA Department of Psychology, shares insights from his work as a renowned expert on human learning. Bjork has been studying learning and memory for more than four decades. Recorded on 02/17/2016. I just loved this video because it shows the serious gap of how we learn versus how we think we learn. Important for police officers and police trainer as well as police leaders to understand!

Reducing Violence is About Not Grabbing a Gun

My good friend Pete Turner has written an enlightening piece "Reducing Violence is About Not Grabbing a Gun" Pete has spent years in conflict zones advising military commanders on how to best better understand their operational effect. More importantly for these leaders is developing their organizational ability create a repeatable and lasting positive affect. Affects are achieved by leveraging culture. Using existing cultural systems allows organizations to speed partnering and success.

What is the Mission and Intent of Policing a Free Society?

The fundamental objectives of policing (also referred to as the mission of the police or the core functions of policing) are the ultimate purposes for which police agencies have been created. Goldstein was one of a number of scholars who recognized and articulated the breadth and complexity of the police mission. He synthesized his understanding of the multiple objectives of the police in his seminal work, Policing a Free Society, a precursor to his writings on problem oriented policing.

Sound of Silence A Tribute to Policing and All Those Who Serve The Homeland

This video was posted up on my FB Page from a friend. The link comes back to Behind the Badge OC. Behind the Badge OC highlights news from a public-safety perspective.

We cover crime and crime prevention. We track trends and share stories about the men and women who keep Orange County safe. And we offer commentary from law enforcement experts.

Thoughts on Policing a Free Society: Altering Public Expectations

“Policing is one of America’s most noble professions. The actions of any officer, in an instant, can impact an individual for life and even a community for generations. Given this realization, every police officer must be centered on what is important. Service, Justice, Fundamental Fairness. These are the foundational principles in which every police action must be grounded. The nobility of policing demands the noblest of character. ”Steven R. Covey

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